Obama education speech analysis

I celebrate such a day. To mark this day — and to honor language arts teachers everywhere — Poynter is republishing an essay I wrote almost a decade ago.

Obama education speech analysis

Hire Writer Obama sprinkles ethos, or ethical proof, throughout his three-point platform. Through this statement, Obama assumes the role of an ethical mediator; he creates situated ethos whereby, as a presidential candidate, he has the power to tell us as a society where we are correct and where we can improve.

By equating American education with moral irresponsibility, he calls society to consider the issues he addresses later in his speech. One such issue is No Child Left Behind, his first premise. Must is a strong word choice; it implies an obligation to something. As an audience member, we make the connection that the obligation is precisely what Obama stated in the introduction.

Analyse Obamas Speech Back to School Essay Example for Free

We must make our educational standards higher for our children; thus, we become motivated to fix No Child Left Behind. Likewise, in his second point, which promises teacher reforms and employment, Obama begins Obama education speech analysis a simple commonplace: Individuals who do good jobs should be rewarded.

Using the ethos from his introduction, he concludes that teachers who do good jobs should be rewarded, which gives motivation for teachers to do well. Obama even goes so far as to inspire change in education among ethnic minorities, his final point. In this point, he calls upon hope—hope that disadvantaged students will one day rise from the bottom with his new learning opportunity programs.

His optimism and confidence calls us, his audience, to change. By holding the audience accountable, educational reform becomes both a private and public matter.

Therefore, the audience, Logos and pathos, however, are still needed to solidify such an undertaking. Simply put, after he explains the unacceptable educational current model to his audience using ethos, he uses logos to depict the reality of how unacceptable the system is.

A cause-and-effect relationship soon follows to support this extended metaphor: Logically, we as the audience then deduce that education, in reality, is profitable. It is in our interest to be well-educated, but as of now, we are losing money from being uneducated. From there, Obama makes a more explicit logical deduction to support his first premise.

His logical reasoning for fixing the program stems from its seemingly insufficient economic policy, which stifles the paychecks of teachers who we as a society want to inspire.

By doing so, he gains more support from educators and economists. Obama also uses logos in his third premise, albeit implicitly. Back in the introduction, Obama quotes the following from Thomas Jefferson, a well-respected president from American history: Obama knows that the general public will agree with anything Thomas Jefferson says because he is so well respected in American history.

Therefore, when he discusses the current issues of ethnic minorities, he conjures support from a broader spectrum of Americans because he is in accordance with Thomas Jefferson.

In that respect, he is able to use logos as a means to show the unacceptable truth behind the educational system—to showcase the relationship between revenue and education as well as highlight student-teacher discrimination—to the widely diverse American people.

The reason for this distinct placement of pathos is elementary: His most effective strategy that does so is his appeal to children. Countless numbers of times, Obama urges us as older Americans to provide better education for our posterity.

Obama education speech analysis

By doing so, he uses our unconditional love for children, perhaps seeing our own children in other children, in a way that grabs our attention so that we may listen and critically think about what he has to say regarding education. On top of using the obligation to children as the basis for attention, Obama also invokes imagery during his oration.Sen.

Barack Obama’s speech, “What’s Possible for Our Children,” was delivered at Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts in Thornton on Wednesday: “It’s an honor to be here at. The theme for President Obama's speech was "Rescue, Rebuild, Restore – a New Foundation for Prosperity".

In his speech, he focused on education reform, repairing America's infrastructure with money not used on the Iraq War, and creating new energy sources in America.

Obama is in his speech talking a lot about responsibility. He is talking about, that teachers, parents and the government have a responsibility to support and help the students to get an education. But it will not make a difference, for as he says, “you as a student do not take responsibility, for your own education”.

Rhetorical Analysis of President Barack Obama’s Inaugural Speech - Assignment Example On In Assignment Sample Barack Obama took his oath as the 44th President of the United States of America on January 20 of this year, during the Presidential Inauguration at the U.

S. Capital Building in Washington, D. C. Watch video · Analysis > Barack Obama's Victory Speech Here's the video, full text and a detailed analysis of the speech Barack Obama made in Chicago on the day of his being elected to the post of President of the USA, Wednesday 5th November, Obama is in his speech talking a lot about responsibility.

He is talking about, that teachers, parents and the government have a responsibility to support and help the students to get an education. But it will not make a difference, for as he says, “you as a student do not take responsibility, for your own education”.

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